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Daniel Konstantinov
Daniel Konstantinov

Script 1


For module scripts, if the async attribute is present then the scripts and all their dependencies will be executed in the defer queue, therefore they will get fetched in parallel to parsing and evaluated as soon as they are available.




Script 1



This attribute allows the elimination of parser-blocking JavaScript where the browser would have to load and evaluate scripts before continuing to parse. defer has a similar effect in this case.


Normal script elements pass minimal information to the window.onerror for scripts which do not pass the standard CORS checks. To allow error logging for sites which use a separate domain for static media, use this attribute. See CORS settings attributes for a more descriptive explanation of its valid arguments.


This attribute allows the elimination of parser-blocking JavaScript where the browser would have to load and evaluate scripts before continuing to parse. async has a similar effect in this case.


A cryptographic nonce (number used once) to allow scripts in a script-src Content-Security-Policy. The server must generate a unique nonce value each time it transmits a policy. It is critical to provide a nonce that cannot be guessed as bypassing a resource's policy is otherwise trivial.


Indicates that the script is a "classic script", containing JavaScript code. Authors are encouraged to omit the attribute if the script refers to JavaScript code rather than specify a MIME type. JavaScript MIME types are listed in the IANA media types specification.


This value causes the code to be treated as a JavaScript module. The processing of the script contents is deferred. The charset and defer attributes have no effect. For information on using module, see our JavaScript modules guide. Unlike classic scripts, module scripts require the use of the CORS protocol for cross-origin fetching.


This attribute explicitly indicates that certain operations should be blocked on the fetching of the script. The operations that are to be blocked must be a space-separated list of blocking attributes listed below.


If present, its value must be an ASCII case-insensitive match for "utf-8". It's unnecessary to specify the charset attribute, because documents must use UTF-8, and the script element inherits its character encoding from the document.


Like the type attribute, this attribute identifies the scripting language in use. Unlike the type attribute, however, this attribute's possible values were never standardized. The type attribute should be used instead.


Scripts without async, defer or type="module" attributes, as well as inline scripts without the type="module" attribute, are fetched and executed immediately before the browser continues to parse the page.


The script should be served with the text/javascript MIME type, but browsers are lenient and only block them if the script is served with an image type (image/*), a video type (video/*), an audio type (audio/*), or text/csv. If the script is blocked, an error event is sent to the element; otherwise, a load event is sent.


Browsers that support the module value for the type attribute ignore any script with a nomodule attribute. That enables you to use module scripts while providing nomodule-marked fallback scripts for non-supporting browsers.


When importing modules in scripts, if you don't use the type=importmap feature, then each module must be imported using a module specifier that is either an absolute or relative URL. In the example below, the first module specifier ("./shapes/square.js") resolves relative to the base URL of the document, while the second is an absolute URL.


You can include render token inside a blocking attribute; the rendering of the page will be blocked till the script is fetched and executed. In the example below, we block rendering on an async script, so that the script doesn't block parsing but is guaranteed to be evaluated before rendering starts.


\n Indicates that the script is a \"classic script\", containing JavaScript code.\n Authors are encouraged to omit the attribute if the script refers to JavaScript code rather than specify a MIME type.\n JavaScript MIME types are listed in the IANA media types specification.\n


\n This value causes the code to be treated as a JavaScript module.\n The processing of the script contents is deferred.\n The charset and defer attributes have no effect.\n For information on using module, see our JavaScript modules guide.\n Unlike classic scripts, module scripts require the use of the CORS protocol for cross-origin fetching.\n


If present, its value must be an ASCII case-insensitive match for \"utf-8\". It's unnecessary to specify the charset attribute, because documents must use UTF-8, and the script element inherits its character encoding from the document.


Scripts without async, defer or type=\"module\" attributes, as well as inline scripts without the type=\"module\" attribute, are fetched and executed immediately before the browser continues to parse the page.


\n The script should be served with the text/javascript MIME type, but browsers are lenient and only block them if the script is served with an image type (image/*), a video type (video/*), an audio type (audio/*), or text/csv.\n If the script is blocked, an error event is sent to the element; otherwise, a load event is sent.\n


\n When importing modules in scripts, if you don't use the type=importmap feature, then each module must be imported using a module specifier that is either an absolute or relative URL.\n In the example below, the first module specifier (\"./shapes/square.js\") resolves relative to the base URL of the document, while the second is an absolute URL.\n


\n You can include render token inside a blocking attribute;\n the rendering of the page will be blocked till the script is fetched and executed. In the example below, we block rendering on an async script,\n so that the script doesn't block parsing but is guaranteed to be evaluated before rendering starts.\n


Dendritic cells (DCs) are can be broadly divided into conventional (cDC) and plasmacytoid (pDC) subsets. Despite the importance of this lineage diversity, its genetic basis is not fully understood. We found that conditional ablation of the Ets-family transcription factor PU.1 in DC-restricted progenitors led to increased pDC production at the expense of cDCs. PU.1 controlled many of the cardinal functions of DCs, such as antigen presentation by cDCs and type I interferon production by pDCs. Conditional ablation of PU.1 de-repressed the pDC transcriptional signature in cDCs. The combination of genome-wide mapping of PU.1 binding and gene expression analysis revealed a key role for PU.1 in maintaining cDC identity through the induction of the transcriptional regulator DC-SCRIPT. PU.1 activated DC-SCRIPT expression, which in turn promoted cDC formation, particularly of cDC1s, and repressed pDC development. Thus, cDC identity is regulated by a transcriptional node requiring PU.1 and DC-SCRIPT.


The functional diversification of dendritic cells (DCs) is a key step in establishing protective immune responses. Despite the importance of DC lineage diversity, its genetic basis is not fully understood. The transcription factor DC-SCRIPT is expressed in conventional DCs (cDCs) and their committed bone marrow progenitors but not in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). We show that mice lacking DC-SCRIPT displayed substantially impaired development of IRF8 (interferon regulatory factor 8)-dependent cDC1, whereas cDC2 numbers increased marginally. The residual DC-SCRIPT-deficient cDC1s had impaired capacity to capture and present cell-associated antigens and to secrete IL-12p40, two functional hallmarks of this population. Genome-wide mapping of DC-SCRIPT binding and gene expression analyses revealed a key role for DC-SCRIPT in maintaining cDC1 identity via the direct regulation of cDC1 signature genes, including Irf8 Our study reveals DC-SCRIPT to be a critical component of the gene regulatory program shaping the functional attributes of cDC1s.


Short scripts are a fantastic way to get your screenwriting feet wet, try a new genre, hone your craft, and get noticed. Put your best short script foot forward by getting notes from our professional readers who have produced short content and are passionate about short form storytelling. 041b061a72


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