top of page

Student Group

Public·14 members
Daniel Konstantinov
Daniel Konstantinov

Capture The Flag Fix



Capture the flag (CTF) is a traditional outdoor sport where two or more teams each have a flag (or other markers) and the objective is to capture the other team's flag, located at the team's "base", and bring it safely back to their own base. Enemy players can be "tagged" by players in their home territory and, depending on the rules, they may be out of the game, become members of the opposite team, sent back to their own territory, or frozen in place ("in jail") until freed by a member of their own team.




Capture the Flag


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlcod.com%2F2uhfIr&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1Yro6rDkQL8krDP1TyJsRR



Capture the Flag requires a playing field of some sort. In both indoor and outdoor versions, the field is divided into two clearly designated halves, known as territories. Players form two teams, one for each territory. Each side has a "flag" which is most often a piece of fabric, but can be any object small enough to be easily carried by a person (night time games might use flashlights, glowsticks or lanterns as the "flags"). Sometimes teams wear dark colors at night to make it more difficult for their opponents to see them.


The objective of the game is for players to venture into the opposing team's territory, grab the flag and return with it to their territory without being tagged. The flag is defended mainly by tagging opposing players who attempt to take it. Within their territory players are "safe", meaning that they cannot be tagged by opposing players. Once they cross into the opposing team's territory they are vulnerable.


The flag is usually placed in a visibly obvious location at the rear of a team's territory. In a more difficult version, the flag is hidden in a place where it can only be seen from certain angles. It also might have some challenge involved. For example, the flag could be hidden in the leaves up in a tall tree, and the players have to see the flag, then knock it out and bring it to their base.


The rules for the handling of the flag also vary from game to game and deal mostly with the disposition of the flag after a failed attempt at capturing it. In one variant, after a player is tagged while carrying the flag, it is returned to its original place. In another variant, the flag is left in the location where the player was tagged. This latter variant makes offensive play easier, as the flag will tend, over the course of the game, to be moved closer to the dividing line between territories. In some games, it is possible for the players to throw the flag to teammates. As long as the flag stays in play without hitting the ground, it is allowed for the players to pass. Normally the capture the flag looks like "flag_for_you".


When the flag is captured by one player, they're not safe from being tagged, unless they trip. Sometimes, the flag holder may not be safe at all, even in their home territory, until they obtain both flags, thus ending the game. But they have the option to return to their own side or hand it off to a teammate who will then carry it to the other side. In most versions the flag may be handed off while running. The game is won when a player returns to their own territory with the enemy flag or both teams' flags, whether it be throw, place, toss, insert, etc. . Also, rarely the flag carrier may not attempt to free any of their teammates from jail.[5]


Alterations may include "one flag" CTF in which there is a defensive team and an offensive team, or games with three or more flags. In the case of the latter, one can only win when all flags are captured, not only one.


Another variation is when the players put bandannas in their pockets with about six inches sticking out. Instead of tagging opponents, players must pull their opponent's bandanna out of their pocket. No matter where a player is when their bandanna is pulled, they're captured and must, depending on the preferences of the players, go to jail, or return to their base before returning to play. In this version there is no team territory, only a small base where the team's flag is kept. To win, one team must have both of the flags in their base.


In some urban settings, the game is played indoors in an enclosed area with walls, similar to the walls in a hockey rink. There is also a spot sticking out of the back of the opposing ends which is connected to the playing area for the flag to be placed in. In this urban variation legal checking hockey style and legal checking against the boards is allowed. A player who commits a foul or illegal check is placed in a penalty box for a specified amount of time, depending on the severity of the foul. A player who deliberately injures an opponent is expelled from the rest of the game. Throwing the flag is allowed in this variation, as long as the flag is caught before it hits the ground. If the flag is thrown to a teammate but hits the ground before it can be caught, the flag is placed from the spot of the throw. If a player throws the flag, but is blocked or intercepted by a player from the opposing team, the flag is placed back at the base.


"Stealing sticks" is a similar game played in the British Isles, the United States, and Australia. However, instead of a flag, a number of sticks or other items such as coats or hats are placed in a "goal" on the far end of each side of the playing field or area. As in capture the flag, players are sent to a "prison" if tagged on the opponents' side, and may be freed by teammates. Each player may only take one of their opponents' sticks at a time. The first team to take all of the opponents' sticks to their own side wins.[6][7]


In 1984, Scholastic published Bannercatch[8] for the Apple II and Commodore computers. An edutainment game with recognizable capture-the-flag mechanics, Bannercatch allows up to two humans (each alternating between two characters in the game world) to play capture the flag against an increasingly difficult team of four AI bots. Bannercatch's game world is divided into quadrants: home, enemy, and two "no-mans land" areas which hold the jails. A successful capture requires bringing the enemy flag into one team's "home" quadrant. Players can be captured when in an enemy territory, or in "no-mans land" while holding a flag. Captured players must be "rescued" from their designated jail by one of the other members of the team. Fallen flags remain where they dropped until a time-out period elapses, after which the flag returns to one of several starting locations in home territory. The 2D map also features walls, trees and a moving river, enabling a wide variety of strategies. Special locations in the play area allow humans to query the game state (such as flag status) using binary messages.


In 1992, Richard Carr released an MS-DOS based game called Capture the Flag.[9] It is a turn-based strategy game with real time network / modem play (or play-by-mail) based around the traditional outdoor game. The game required players to merely move one of their characters onto the same square as their opponent's flag, as opposed to bringing it back to friendly territory, because of difficulties implementing the artificial intelligence that the computer player would have needed to bring the enemy flag home and intercept opposing characters carrying the flag.[citation needed]


In computer security Capture the Flag (CTF), "flags" are secrets hidden in purposefully-vulnerable programs or websites. Competitors steal flags either from other competitors (attack/defense-style CTFs) or from the organizers (jeopardy-style challenges).[10][11][12] Several variations exist, including hiding flags in hardware devices.


In some versions of the game, captured players are sent to "jail" and must be tagged by a teammate to be freed. That's a fun way to play but it also means less physical activity. So, consider giving the sweat-out-of-jail strategy a try. Decide beforehand how you'll handle captured players, and make sure everyone knows the plan.


Capture the flag is hard to set up, but incredibly fun and complex to actually play. If you have at least 8 people, a large piece of land to play on, and two flags, you're already ready to go. The goal is to grab the enemy team's hidden flag and bring it back to your side -- but if you get tagged in enemy territory you're off to jail. The first team to steal the other's flag wins.


capture the flag is rely fun. my troop usaly plays it in the woods or somewhere that is not in an open feald though. we also find a ditch or a path and make that the middle line. the flags always change position after each game. we play is a little diffenrtly but i guess thats part of house rules or whatever. the game is fun.


Each type of event has various pros and cons. In a Red Team vs. Blue Team scenario, the attackers learn vital techniques while the defenders have a chance to learn how to defend their systems from an active attack. In a Red Team scenario, however, everyone gangs up on the poor CTF host and does their best to have it divulge every flag the attackers can get their digital claws on.


As I mentioned earlier, there was a BSides event in San Francisco that hosted a CTF session a few months ago. We can look more closely at this event to give you a better idea of what capture the flag is all about.


To solve this, we need to figure out how to utilize a string format vulnerability to give us a flag. The details of this are technical and in depth, so please see the resources section below for links to the various challenges mentioned in this post and you can then utilize the various write-ups about the different solutions that were used to solve the challenges/tasks.


To investigate this problem, we look at 3D first-person multiplayer video games. These games represent the most popular genre of video game, and have captured the imagination of millions of gamers because of their immersive game play, as well as the challenges they pose in terms of strategy, tactics, hand-eye coordination, and team play. The challenge for our agents is to learn directly from raw pixels to produce actions. This complexity makes first-person multiplayer games a fruitful and active area of research within the AI community. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page