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Angel Turner
Angel Turner

Where To Buy Carprofen For Dogs


Side effects in dogs include gastrointestinal upset, such as mild vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, and temporary lack of appetite, as well as tiredness. More serious side effects include liver, kidney, or gastrointestinal damage characterized by severe vomiting, diarrhea, black or bloody stools, bloody vomit, increased drinking and/or urination, yellow skin or eyes, severe lethargy, and persistent lack of appetite. Other reported serious side effects include neurologic signs such as incoordination, paralysis, seizures, or disorientation, behavior signs such as restlessness, or aggression, skin effects such as itchiness, hair loss, or scabs/wounds, or allergic reactions such as facial swelling or hives. Your veterinarian may see blood abnormalities such as low red blood cell or platelet counts on bloodwork.




where to buy carprofen for dogs



Carprofen should not be used in pets with bleeding disorders such as Von Willebrand disease or those with low platelet counts, or in pets that are allergic to it or other NSAIDs in the same class. It should be used cautiously in pets younger than 6 weeks of age, older pets, pregnant or lactating pets, dehydrated pets, or pets with pre-existing diseases, especially liver, kidney, heart, or gastrointestinal disease. It should be used cautiously in pets that have had bone surgery or injury, as carprofen may affect bone healing. Carprofen should be used cautiously, if at all in cats, or in pets taking other NSAIDs or corticosteroids.


The following medications should be used with caution when given with carprofen: anticoagulants, ACE inhibitors, aspirin or other NSAIDs, corticosteroids, cyclosporine or other nephrotoxic medications, dacarbazine, dactinomycin, desmopressin, digoxin, dinoprost, highly protein bound medications, insulin, oral antidiabetics, loop diuretics, methotrexate, or tricyclic antidepressants.


Prior to starting carprofen, baseline bloodwork and urinalysis should be performed by your veterinarian. For long-term carprofen use, liver enzymes and kidney values should be checked 2 to 4 weeks after starting the medication, and then every 3 to 6 months during therapy. At home, monitor for serious side effects, and discontinue the medication and contact your veterinarian if these occur. Your veterinarian may monitor your pet to be sure that the medication is working.


Based upon comparison with data obtained from intravenous administration, Carprofen is rapidly and nearly completely absorbed (more than 90% bioavailable) when administered orally.l0 Peak blood plasma concentrations are achieved in 1-3 hours after oral administration of 1, 5, and 25 mg/kg to dogs. The mean terminal half-life of Carprofen is approximately 8 hours (range 4.5-9.8 hours) after single oral doses varying from 1-35 mg/kg of body weight. After a 100 mg single intravenous bolus dose, the mean elimination half-life was approximately 11.7 hours in the dog. Carprofen is more than 99% bound to plasma protein and exhibits a very small volume of distribution.


Carprofen is an NSAID, and as with others in that class, adverse reactions may occur with its use. The most frequently reported effects have been gastrointestinal signs. Events involving suspected renal, hematologic, neurologic, dermatologic, and hepatic effects have also been reported. Patients at greatest risk for renal toxicity are those that are dehydrated, on concomitant diuretic therapy, or those with renal, cardiovascular, and/or hepatic dysfunction. Concurrent administration of potentially nephrotoxic drugs should be approached cautiously, with appropriate monitoring. Since NSAIDs possess the potential to induce gastrointestinal ulcerations and/or gastrointestinal perforations, concomitant use of Carprofen and other anti-inflammatory drugs, such as NSAIDs or corticosteroids, should be avoided. If additional pain medication is needed after administration of the total daily dose of Carprofen, a non-NSAID or non-corticosteroid class of analgesia should be considered. The use of another NSAID is not recommended. Sensitivity to drug-associated adverse reactions varies with the individual patient. Dogs that have experienced adverse reactions from one NSAID may experience adverse reactions from another NSAID. Carprofen treatment was not associated with renal toxicity or gastrointestinal ulceration in well-controlled safety studies of up to ten times the dose in dogs. Carprofen Caplets is not recommended for use in dogs with bleeding disorders (e.g., Von Willebrand's disease), as safety has not been established in dogs with these disorders. The safe use of Carprofen Caplets in animals less than 6 weeks of age, pregnant dogs, dogs used for breeding purposes, or in lactating bitches has not been established. Studies to determine the activity of Carprofen when administered concomitantly with other protein-bound or similarly metabolized drugs have not been conducted.


All dogs should undergo a thorough history and physical examination before initiation of NSAID therapy. Appropriate laboratory tests to establish hematological and serum biochemical baseline data prior to, and periodically during, administration of any NSAID should be considered. Owners should be advised to observe for signs of potential drug toxicity (see Information for Dog Owners, Adverse Reactions, Animal Safety and Post-Approval Experience).


The vast majority of patients with drug related adverse reactions have recovered when the signs are recognized, the drug is withdrawn and veterinary care, if appropriate, is initiated. Owners should be advised of the importance of periodic follow up for all dogs during administration of any NSAID.


Separate placebo-controlled, masked, multicenter field studies confirmed the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effectiveness of Carprofen when dosed at 2 mg/lb once daily or when divided and administered at 1 mg/lb twice daily. In these two field studies, dogs diagnosed with osteoarthritis showed statistically significant overall improvement based on lameness evaluations by the veterinarian and owner observations when administered Carprofen at labeled doses.


Separate placebo-controlled, masked, multicenter field studies confirmed the effectiveness of Carprofen for the control of postoperative pain when, dosed at 2 mg/lb once daily in various breeds of dogs. In these studies, dogs presented for ovariohysterectomy, cruciate repair and aural surgeries were administered Carprofen preoperatively and for a maximum of 3 days (soft tissue) or 4 days (orthopedic) postoperatively. In general, dogs administered Carprofen showed statistically significant improvement in pain scores compared to controls.


In target animal safety studies, Carprofen was administered orally to healthy Beagle dogs at 1, 3, and 5 mg/lb twice daily (1, 3 and 5 times the recommended total daily dose) for 42 consecutive days with no significant adverse reactions. Serum albumin for a single female dog receiving 5 mg/lb twice daily decreased to 2.1 g/dL after 2 weeks of treatment, returned to the pre-treatment value (2.6 g/dL) after 4 weeks of treatment, and was 2.3 g/dL at the final 6-week evaluation. Over the 6-week treatment period, black or bloody stools were observed in 1 dog (1 incident) treated with 1 mg/lb twice daily and in 1 dog (2 incidents) treated with 3 mg/lb twice daily. Redness of the colonic mucosa was observed in 1 male that received 3 mg/lb twice daily.


Two of 8 dogs receiving 10 mg/lb orally twice daily (10 times the recommended total daily dose) for 14 days exhibited hypoalbuminemia. The mean albumin level in the dogs receiving this dose was lower (2.38 g/dL) than each of 2 placebo control groups (2.88 and 2.93 g/dL, respectively). Three incidents of black or bloody stool were observed in 1 dog. Five of 8 dogs exhibited reddened areas of duodenal mucosa on gross pathologic examination. Histologic examination of these areas revealed no evidence of ulceration, but did show minimal congestion of the lamina propria in 2 of the 5 dogs.


In separate safety studies lasting 13 and 52 weeks, respectively, dogs were administered orally up to 11.4 mg/lb/day (5.7 times the recommended total daily dose of 2 mg/lb) of Carprofen. In both studies, the drug was well tolerated clinically by all of the animals. No gross or histologic changes were seen in any of the treated animals. In both studies, dogs receiving the highest doses had average increases in serum L-alanine aminotransferase (ALT) of approximately 20 IU.


In the 52-week study, minor dermatologic changes occurred in dogs in each of the treatment groups but not in the control dogs. The changes were described as slight redness or rash and were diagnosed as non-specific dermatitis. The possibility exists that these mild lesions were treatment related, but no dose relationship was observed.


Clinical field studies were conducted with 549 dogs of different breeds at the recommended oral doses for 14 days (297 dogs were included in a study evaluating 1 mg/lb twice daily and 252 dogs were included in a separate study evaluating 2 mg/lb once daily). In both studies the drug was clinically well tolerated and the incidence of clinical adverse reactions for Carprofen-treated animals was no higher than placebo-treated animals (placebo contained inactive ingredients found in Carprofen caplets). For animals receiving 1 mg/lb twice daily, the mean post-treatment serum ALT values were 11 IU greater and 9 IU less than pre-treatment values for dogs receiving Carprofen and placebo, respectively. Differences were not statistically significant. For animals receiving 2 mg/lb once daily, the mean post-treatment serum ALT values were 4.5 IU greater and 0.9 IU less than pre-treatment values for dogs receiving Carprofen and placebo, respectively. In the latter study, 3 Carprofen-treated dogs developed a 3-fold or greater increase in (ALT) and/or (AST) during the course of therapy. One placebo-treated dog had a greater than 2-fold increase in ALT. None of these animals showed clinical signs associated with the laboratory value changes. Changes in clinical laboratory values (hematology and clinical chemistry) were not considered clinically significant. The 1 mg/lb twice daily course of therapy was repeated as needed at 2-week intervals in 244 dogs, some for as long as 5 years. 041b061a72


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